YellowForever

"The trouble is that we have a bad habit, encouraged by pendants and sophisticates, of considering happiness as something rather stupid. Only pain is intellectual, only evil interesting. This is the treason of the artist: a refusal to admit the banality of evil and the terrible boredom of pain."
Ursula K. Le Guin (via observando)

(via savedher)

— 5 days ago with 1175 notes

People always make Juliet out to be dumb in Romeo and Juliet, but I think she at least had some sense where Romeo didn't have much of any

Romeo:I was thinking about this chick earlier who I said I was in love with but now I love that girl over there that is very likely to either belong to my family's enemy or be close with my family's enemy as it is their party I am crashing
Juliet:I do not like being so young and forced into a relationship with an older man, but oh there's a cute guy more my age over there. And since he's here he must have been invited and is there for a reasonable love match for myself
--
Romeo:We should kiss right now at this party
Juliet:No that is a super dumb idea
Romeo:*kisses her anyway*
Juliet:That was dumb of you
--
Romeo:We should get married right now
Juliet:We don't know each other. Shouldn't we wait until at least a little time has passed?
Romeo:Like tomorrow?
Juliet:Sure, fine.
--
Juliet:We're married now, so we have to try and make things better between our families.
Romeo:Right.
Romeo:It seems I have killed your cousin and am now exiled.
--
Juliet:Ok so since Romeo fucked up I'm gonna fix this shit by taking a harmless sleeping liquid. He'll come and get me and we can go away together.
Romeo:*immediately kills himself*
Juliet:For fucks sake.
— 5 days ago with 40504 notes
fleurdulys:

The human enigma: The Silence - Giorgio Kienerk
1900

fleurdulys:

The human enigma: The Silence - Giorgio Kienerk

1900

(via thewindysideofcare)

— 5 days ago with 655 notes

charleypollard:

i want female villains whose backstory don’t revolve around men breaking their hearts or wanting to be more beautiful than another girl  i want female villains who are evil for the fun of it and i want female villains with tragic backstories that don’t revolve around men i want female villains with backstories and motives just as diverse and complex as male villains i’m so sick of female villains who are only motivated by men and girlhate

(Source: steveeugenecarlsberg, via scrumtrulescent)

— 5 days ago with 182627 notes

top500songs:

105.

"The Boxer" was released by American folk rock duo Simon & Garfunkel in 1970 as the sixth track on their fifth studio album "Bridge over Troubled Water" through Columbia Records. It was written by lead vocalist and guitarist Paul Simon. The song peaked at number 7 on the US Billboard Hot 100 Chart.

(via theteastainedpages)

— 5 days ago with 294 notes
#music 

The rendezvous, Pierre-Charles Comte. French (1853 - 1895)

The rendezvous, Pierre-Charles Comte. French (1853 - 1895)

(Source: poboh, via seabois)

— 5 days ago with 893 notes
baciodellarte:

The Birth of Venus, circa 1879, William-Adolphe Bouguereau

The Birth of Venus (French: La Naissance de Vénus) is one of the most famous paintings by 19th-century painter William-Adolphe Bouguereau. It depicts not the actual birth of Venus from the sea, but her transportation in a shell, as a fully mature woman, from the sea to Paphos in Cyprus. She is considered the epitome of the finest expressions of the Classical Greek and Roman ideal of the female form and beauty, on a par with Venus de Milo. For Bouguereau, it is considered a tour de force. The canvas stands at just over 9 ft 10 in (3.00 m) high, and 7 ft 2 in (2.18 m) wide. The subject matter, as well as the composition, resembles a previous rendition of this subject, Sandro Botticelli’s The Birth of Venus, as well as Raphael’s The Triumph of Galatea.

baciodellarte:

The Birth of Venus, circa 1879, William-Adolphe Bouguereau

The Birth of Venus (French: La Naissance de Vénus) is one of the most famous paintings by 19th-century painter William-Adolphe Bouguereau. It depicts not the actual birth of Venus from the sea, but her transportation in a shell, as a fully mature woman, from the sea to Paphos in Cyprus. She is considered the epitome of the finest expressions of the Classical Greek and Roman ideal of the female form and beauty, on a par with Venus de Milo. For Bouguereau, it is considered a tour de force. The canvas stands at just over 9 ft 10 in (3.00 m) high, and 7 ft 2 in (2.18 m) wide. The subject matter, as well as the composition, resembles a previous rendition of this subject, Sandro Botticelli’s The Birth of Venus, as well as Raphael’s The Triumph of Galatea.

(via seabois)

— 5 days ago with 2084 notes
mad-moiselle-bulle:

Noè Bordignon (Italian, 1841-1920), Primavera (detail, ca. 1890).

mad-moiselle-bulle:

Noè Bordignon (Italian, 1841-1920), Primavera (detail, ca. 1890).

(via seabois)

— 5 days ago with 2040 notes
#art